Safflower
shopping: two varieties
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per 1/4 Pound
Quantity:  
$20.35$17.30 
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per Pound
Quantity:  
$50.86$43.23 
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per 1/4 Pound
Quantity:  
$16.36$13.91 
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per Pound
Quantity:  
$40.89$34.76 

Wholesale Safflower

Carthamus tinctorius
plant overview
sometimes a saffron substitute

Safflower is in the daisy family native to the Middle East and grown in the U.S. Europe, Mexico and India. It produces vibrant yellow to red flowers and the seeds yield an edible oil commonly used for cooking. The dried safflower flowers are often used as a saffron substitute.

Antioxidant qualities are one of the safflower herb benefits. Safflower powder can also be used to make a paste or infused oil to help with inflammation. Where to buy safflower? Here at Herb Co. we offer powder and cut & sifted safflower by the pound or quarter pound to meet your formulation needs.

Clicking "learn more" next to each variety will take you to individual product pages for details.
Safflower

01.
A Bit of Botany

a little botanical information about safflower

description
Carthamus tinctorius, aka safflower—not to be confused with saffron which though similar sounding in name, is from an entirely different plant—is a herbaceous, highly branched, thistle-like annual plant of the Asteraceae family.

Safflower can reach heights of 1 to 5 feet in height (roughly 30 to 150 cm). Safflower's globular flower heads bloom with red, orange, or yellow flowers. From one to five flower heads will present themselves on branch; usually each flower head will contain from 15 to 20 seeds per head.

The plant grows deep taproot which enables it to thrive in its native arid environments having only seasonal rain.

common names & nomenclature
The common name of safflower is traced to the 16th century Dutch saffloer or German safflor from Old French saffleur, from Early Italian saffiore.

Also known as:
safflower, zafran, dyer's saffron, false saffron, bastard saffron, carthamine, beni, chimichanga, saliflower, american saffron

Safflower, sometimes a saffron substitute

02.
Where in the World

habitat and range for safflower

Safflower is native to India and Iran. It is cultivated in North American and other regions.

03.
Cultivation & Harvesting

considerations for growing and harvesting safflower

climate
Safflower is native to a climate with a long dry season and a limited rainy season in full sun.

soil
Adapted to poor, dry soils, avoid water-logged soils.

growing
Sow seeds in spring in gentle heat in a greenhouse. Germination usually takes place within 2-4 weeks at 15°C. Transplant into individual pots when large enough to handle, plant into the garden in late spring or early summer.

harvesting
The flowers are harvested in the summer and can be used fresh or dried.

preserving
Store dried safflower and powdered safflower in an airtight container in a cool, dry place. It should not be stored for longer than 12 months.

04.
The Rest of the Story

Recipes and Formulation

Making safflower herbal tea is an enjoyable way to take advantage of it's benefits. Simply steep in hot water and enjoy. While safflower is similar to saffron, the flavor is more mild once cooked. To use in your culinary dishes you can add a pinch to enhance color and flavor. Also cooking foods in unsaturated fat is a healthy choice. As a result, a wide variety of vegetable based oils are on the market. One of the healthiest of those choices is safflower oil. But safflower oil is for more than just cooking. As you’ll see, it has many health benefits you can enjoy.

Health Benefits

Powdered safflower has a variety of health benefits and is rich in calcium, magnesium, folate, phosphorous and fatty acids. The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant qualities of the herb are due to a variety of flavonoid glycosides, including kaempferol, quercetin and at least seven serotonin derivatives. Safflower can be applied topically as a paste or used as infused in oil to make salves and balms. Safflower powder can also be encapsulated as a dietary supplement.

for educational purposes only

This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

please be advised: 
Before making any changes to your diet you should always consult with your doctor,
especially if you are pregnant, nursing or have existing conditions.