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Chia Seed Whole

Chia Seed Whole

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Chia seed is obtained from the dried flowers of a plant in the mint family that thrives in the warm climates of Mexico and western North America. Aside from notoriety for generating the "hair" in Chia Pets, the seed is fiber dense, packed with nutrients and has endless culinary uses.

kosher certificate information
Salvia hispanica

Chia Seed Whole

Chia seed, whole

Chia Seeds




Scientific Name: Salvia Hispanica
Origin: Mexico

Common Names : Chia seeds

Parts used: Seed, Leaf

Nutrient and Active Compounds:

Constituents: linolenic acid, linoleic acid; antioxidants: chlorogenic and caffeic acids, myricetin, quercitin, and kaempferol flavonol. chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and flavonol glycosides; mucin, fibre; 8 essential amino acids (score 115.)

Vitamins: A, B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, B15, B17, C, D, E, K, choline, folic acid, inositol, PABA.

Minerals: boron, calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, phosphorous, potassium, silicon, sodium, strontium, sulphur, zinc, amylose (a slow-burning starch helpful in treating hypoglycemia), and electrolytes.

Chia Seeds Nutrition Facts: Chia has a very good ratio of omega-3 oil to omega-6 oil; with 20-30% protein, 35% oil, 25% fiber. Gluten-free and very low-sodium. Contains the important mineral boron, a catalyst for the absorption of calcium.

Background: Domesticated in the valley of Mexico as early as 2,700 B.C., chia seeds served as a primary staple food of the Nahuatl (Aztec), Mayan, Incan and other indigenous peoples.

One spoon of seed in water was used to supply sustenance for an entire day of hard labor. Related to the Nahuatl words Chiapan (river of chia: possibly related to its broad cultivation), and chia (energy/strength.) Its cultivation is referenced in the Florentine Codex. So highly prized were the seeds that they were used as currency.

Traditionally and presently used by the Tarahumara and Chumash of Chihuahua, the seed is roasted, crushed, and mixed with water for a gel of extremely high nutritional value used as performance food. In California, Arizona, Mexico, Guatemala and Nicaragua it was, and is, mixed with a lemonade. The ground seed meal was called pinole.

In the 1980's chia seeds experienced kitsch notoriety as Chia Pets;
when watered, the seeds grew into green hair on terracotta figurines.
Fortunately today, better use of chia has been rediscovered.

Chia Seeds and Nutritional Facts: The seeds contain about 20% protein, 35% oil and an
impressive 25% dietary fiber. They are high in antioxidants and also
offer a range of vitamins and minerals, including calcium, phosphorus,
magnesium and zinc. And as one of the richest vegetable sources of
omega-3 fatty acids.

 

The seeds have a mild, nutty flavor and can be enjoyed on salads,
cereal, yogurt or ground up and baked into wholesome breads and
muffins. A popular drink in Mexico is the chia fresca ­ made with 2
teaspoons of seeds stirred into a glass of water with lime and sugar.
Chia seeds are very stable and can be easily stored without
refrigeration. Our chia comes from Mexico, where its long history
first began.

Chia Seeds Contains much high-quality natural oil: 3-10 times that of most grains and twice the protein.

Chia can substitute flax seeds. Flavor is neutral.

Chia sprouts are used as alfalfa sprouts. 

Chia SeedsChia Seed Plant



General: Mint family (Lamiaceae).

Chia is native to western North America. The plants can vary greatly in size depending on moisture availability ranging, in both height and diameter, from 3 to 4 cm under very dry conditions to 60 cm under optimal conditions. The thick, wrinkled leaves (10 to 15 cm long) are dark green and deeply lobed with a thin covering of fine, soft, grayish hairs on the upper surface.

Leaves grow predominantly from the basal area of the plant with smaller leaves growing up the stems. Several stems emerge from the base of the plant, each bearing from one to four interrupted (2 to 3 cm apart) button-like whorls of tiny, tubular flowers (6-16mm).

The pale blue to deep blue flowers have two lips; the white-tipped lower lip is cleft into three lobes, with the central lobe slightly larger in size. Several contrasting leafy, burgundy-colored bracts subtend the flower heads. A spiny tip protrudes from a central notch in each bract. Each flower results in up to 13 tiny, gray to light brown, flat seeds 1.5-2mm in length.

Flowers bloom in late spring or early summer, from March through June in California. As the season progresses, the blossoms dry and turn from clear blue to golden, and remain dry upon their stems. The tiny seeds disperse by shaking out of the dry blossoms.
 

 

How to use chia seeds 



Soaking the chia seeds is the most common way to eat them. They can absorb a large amount of liquid in a rapid amount of time, between 10 -12 times their volume, in under 8 minutes.

The Basic Chia Seed Gel

To make a basic chia gel, simply add 1/3 cup of seeds (2oz) to 2 cups of water. Stir the mixture well and  then leave it in your fridge, in a sealed jar. This will yield around 17oz of chia gel. You can begin to eat the gel almost immediately if you like. Just 9 minutes is enough time for the gel to be formed. Allowing the chia seeds to sit for even longer (a few hours) will allow even more of the nutrients to be accessible, so many people like to make up a batch like this and leave it in the fridge. It will stay good for about three weeks. Then you can just reach into the fridge and take out some of the ready-made gel whenever you need it. You might add it to smoothies, mix it with salad dressings, puddings or granola, or simply take it by the spoonful.

As mentioned above, chia will absorb anything, it doesn't have to soak in water. We like soaking it in things like apple juice for example. That way, the intense sweetness of the apple juice is also offset by the chia and it tastes yummy. We also often blend fruits; for example bananas and persimmons, then stir the chia into that mixture. Again, the longer the seeds are left to soak, the more their nutrients will be readily available to you, yet you could easily eat a meal like this 10 minutes or less after preparing it.

Description: An annual herbaceous plant of the mint family growing 3-4 feet tall with opposing leaves. Flowers are purple or white in numerous clusters in a spike at the end of each stem. Seeds have an ellipse shape, 2mm in length, varietal seeds, mottled in color, are predominantly either mostly brown, gray, black or white.

Ten Raw Chia Seed Recipes

Some of these recipes may seem quite peculiar or unfamiliar to those who are not accustomed to eating raw. We encourage you to try them out though and to perhaps use them as a 'spring-board' for creating and enjoying your own chia recipes. All of these recipes are based on one person eating.

Basic Chia Seeds Gel

Chia
Water

Mix 1/3-cup chia seeds to 2 cups water. Stir. This is the 'basic gel' recipe that can be stored in your fridge and used as required.

Sweet Shortbread Chia

4-5 tbsps chia seeds
2 cups fresh apple juice
2 tbsp lucuma powder
1/4 cup dried mulberries
1/4 cup pumpkin seeds

Soak the chia seeds in the apple juice. Stir in the remaining ingredients. Leave to soak for at least 10 minutes before consuming.

'Chia Fresca'

2 tsp chia seeds
10oz pure water
juice of one lemon or lime
agave syrup or raw honey to taste

This is still a popular drink in modern-day Mexico. Simply stir the ingredients together and enjoy.

Fruity Chia

3 small or 2 big apples
8 dates, pits removed
4-5 tbsp chia seeds
1/4 cup dried mulberries

Blend the apples and six of the dates together. Transfer that mixture into a bowl and stir in the chia seeds and mulberries. Chop down the remaining 2 dates into pieces and stir those in too. Leave to soak for at least 10 minutes before consuming.

Bana-paya Chia

1 banana
3/4 cup papaya flesh
6 dried Turkish figs
4-5 tbsp chia seeds, ground

Blend the banana and papaya flesh together. Put the figs in this mixture and leave it to soak overnight. Blend the whole mixture, including the figs, the next day. Stir in the ground chia seeds. Serve.

Green Chia

8 dried prunes, soaked in 1 pint pure water
1 tbsp spirulina powder
1/3 cup chia seeds

Drain off most of the prune soak water and put the chia seeds to soak in the prune soak water. Blend together the prunes with the spirulina and a small amount of the soak water. Stir the spirulina/prune mixture into the soaked chia seeds. Leave the chia to soak for at least 10 minutes before consuming.

Chia Gel 'Muesli'

1 cup of basic chia gel
2 bananas, mashed with a fork
1 tbsp lucuma powder
1/4 cup raisins
1/4 cup pumpkin seeds

Mix together the ingredients in a bowl with a fork and eat.

 

Persi-nana Chia

4-5 tbsp chia seeds
1-2 bananas
1-2 persimmons
1tsp maca
1 tsp cinnamon
handful of goji berries
handful of pumpkin seeds

Blend together the bananas and persimmons. Pour out the mixture into a bowl. Stir in the chia seeds, maca, cinnamon, gojis and pumpkin seeds. Leave the chia to soak for at least 10 minutes before consuming.

Raw 'Rice Pudding'

4-5 tbsp chia seeds
2 cups almond milk
raw honey or agave syrup to taste

Combine the ingredients to your taste. Leave the chia to soak for at least 10 minutes before consuming. You can also add other flavours like vanilla, cinnamon or cardamom.

Banana-nut Bread

2 cups vegetable juice pulp (preferably at least half carrot)
8 tbsp ground chia seeds
3/4 cup chopped walnuts
3/4 cup raisins
5 bananas

Mix together



Safety:
There are no known toxic components or safety issues associated with use of chia seeds.


Chia Seeds Article


More Bulk Herbs and Spices Information:

Chives
Cinnamon
Chia seed
Cloves
Cayenne
Club moss

                                                                                               

For educational purposes only
This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

 






Video Transcript

Chia seed is an ancient Mayan staple obtained from the Mexican native chia plant or Salvia hispanica, named after the Mayan word “strength.” This modern super food was aptly named since the seeds were known by several indigenous peoples to promote endurance. In fact, chia seed was often the only source of nutrition consumed by the ancient Aztecs and southwestern tribes of the U.S. while traveling great distances.

Nutritionally speaking, chia seeds pack a wallop. It consists of about 30% protein, and an abundance of vitamins A, B, D, E and K as well as alpha-linolenic and linoleic acid, which are essential fatty acids the body cannot manufacture on its own. In addition to containing calcium, copper, iodine, iron, magnesium, manganese, niacin, phosphorus, potassium, silicon, sodium, sulfur, thiamine, and zinc, chia seed is the richest plant-based source of omega-3. It is also an excellence source of soluble fiber, and a mere quarter cup of chia seeds supplies as much calcium as three cups of milk, as much magnesium as ten stalks of broccoli, 30% more antioxidants than blueberries, and 25% more dietary fiber than flaxseed.

The seeds have a mild nutty flavor and can be enjoyed on salads, cereal, yogurt, or ground-up and baked into wholesome breads and muffins. However, soaking the chia seeds is the most common way to eat them. They can absorb a large amount of liquid in a rapid amount of time, between 10 and 12 times their volume in under 8 minutes. Just add the chia seed gel to smoothies. Mix it up with salad dressings, puddings, or granola, or simply take it by the spoonful.

To make a basic chia gel, simply add 1/3 cup of seeds or 2 oz. to 2 cups of water. Stir the mixture well and then leave it in your refrigerator in a sealed jar. This will yield around 17 oz. of chia gel. You can begin to eat the gel almost immediately if you like. Just nine minutes is enough time for the gel to be formed. Allowing the chia seeds to sit for even longer, such as a few hours, will allow even more of the nutrients to be accessible. So many people like to make up a batch like this and leave it in the fridge. It will stay good for about three weeks. Then you can just reach into the fridge and take out some of the ready-made gel whenever you need it.

Chia will absorb anything, so you don’t just have to soak it in water. We like soaking it in things like apple juice, for example. That way, the intense sweetness of the apple juice is also offset by the chia and its great taste. We also often blend fruits such as bananas or persimmons then stir the chia into that mixture. Again, the longer the seeds are left to soak, the more their nutrients will be readily available to you. Still, you can easily eat a meal like this, 10 minutes or less after preparing it.

To experience this wonder food order your chia seeds today by visiting herbco.com. There you can also use several recipes using chia seeds and chia gel. While you are there be sure to check out the hundreds of other herbs, spices, teas and herbal supplies available from Monterey Bay Spice Company.

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for educational purposes only

This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

please be advised: 
you should always consult with your doctor
before making any changes to your diet!!
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